Anatomical Study – Joseph Maclise – Circa 1851

A beautiful and rare detailed 19th Century hand coloured lithograph by M & N Hanhart printers. “The drawings of Maclise for Quain’s Anatomy of the arteries and for his own Surgical anatomy are indeed done, as Quain wrote, with spirit and effect. These figures of anatomical dissection seem lifelike; in many plates, the figure is shown as a torso, or a bust, or as a full-or half-length figure. The faces seem to be a gallery of portraits, perhaps of visitors to the 1851 Great Exhibition. They are mostly young men with fine hair-bearded, clean-shaven, or mustachioed, with or without sideburns. Many appear god-like. This is indeed ‘high’ art, only incidentally of an anatomical subject. If the analogy is not too far-fetched, Maclise’s drawing may be compared with the work in different media of the English Romantic poets or of the composer Berlioz. The same comparisons have been made in relation to the work of the Victorian artist Daniel Maclise (1806-70), Joseph Maclise’s older brother. They remained close, traveling in Italy together, and sharing houses in Bloomsbury and Chelsea” Dimensions: H 26 in. x W 20 in. x D 2 in.

£375.00

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